Migration and the shared planet

Migration has been a constant factor shaping human history. People have moved from one geographic area to another for ages, sometimes out of choice, but far too often fleeing threats to personal safety and physical survival. In our times, immigration has become a point of tension in international politics as well as a significant cause of rising socio-political discord within countries. In this second part of our series on “Shared Societies”, Clem McCartney describes a path away from the fear, alienation, desperation and misery, which have marked the issue of migration. The article imagines a place where new solutions could be crafted and executed in an efficient and humane manner, more in consonance with our shared humanity than the malign cycles that our society has been caught up in.

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Decolonial feminism and Buen Vivir

The idea and practice of Buen Vivir have gained popularity all over South America because of its far-reaching socio-political acuity and penetration. Thinkers and practitioners of “alternatives” have analyzed Buen Vivir’s efficacy in dealing with various societal challenges – gender relations being a significant subject for that interrogation. Dennis Avilés Irahola provides an insight into how decolonial feminists are assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the process of implementation of the principles of Buen Vivir taking the Constituent Assemblies of Bolivia and Ecuador as examples, and how it could be sharpened to create an “alternative” paradigm in the continent without delaying action on women’s demands.

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Looking Beyond Entrepreneurial Illusions to End Africa’s Food Crisis

The African rural hinterland is under the assault of a garbled idea of “development”. A market oriented entrepreneurial model of agriculture, however, has failed to tackle the deep roots of poverty in these areas. Terry Leahy, an Australian sociologist, has been studying the steady evolution of an alternative framework for rural agriculture in southern and eastern Africa, which focuses on increasing food security through subsistence production. His recent book, “Food Security for Rural Africa: Feeding the Farmers First” challenges the models promoted by academics in the field of development studies and argues against the strategies adopted by most donor organizations and government bodies. In this article Leahy introduces us to the simple but effective idea of ensuring household food security through household production.

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Lessons from the Kickapoo: Radical Conviviality in Community Conservation

The Kickapoo River valley in Wisconsin, USA was condemned to reckless “development” in the 1970s as a mega-dam flood control project got underway. But that move was met with resistance from the Ho-Chunk people who consider the area their sacred homeland. Paul Robbins and Marcy West recount the powerful story of a community led and focused ecological revival of the Kickapoo valley, underscoring the triumph of negotiations and collaboration over mistrust and fear.

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How an Ecuadorian Community is Showing Its Government How to Really Live Well

After a fiery start in the early 2000s, progressive intent and revolutionary rhetoric are finding it difficult to usher in a meaningful transformation in South America. Neema Pathak-Broome and Ashish Kothari explain how the left in Ecuador is facing up to its dilemmas.

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